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The lesson plan below demonstrates integration of reading strategies into a lesson.

Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Page Layouts

Lesson topic: Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Text Page Layouts
CTE program area: Communication Technologies II
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Prerequisite skills:

    Working knowledge of Adobe InDesign Basic understanding of balance & symmetry (Principles of design/Comm Tech 1/ instruction focused on images not text layouts) Basic understanding of grid layouts

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
Students will be able to:

    Distinguish between symmetrical and asymmetrical text page layouts Discuss making active choices regarding use of symmetrical and asymmetrical page layouts Infer from reading an author’s perspective on symmetrical and asymmetrical page layouts Produce versions of a document using symmetrical and asymmetrical page layouts

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

Communication Technologies Competencies:

    Apply layout processes including formatting: text alignment, columns/grids, pagination, margins, gutters, leaders and headers, type size/typeface and graphics according to job specifications, Use proofreader’s marks to identify errors while proofreading, and read proofreaders marks to correct errors. Create media products including: text graphics and other media, within a process that incorporates planning, content development, organization/design & layout, revision, editing, and production.

CCSS

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Brief description of the lesson:
1.   Students view two report covers on Smartboard, one symmetrical & one asymmetrical in layout.  Review terms symmetrical & asymmetrical from unit “Principles of Graphic Design”

2. TPS –

    List three words or phrases you would use to describe each cover. Why might people with less desktop publishing experience automatically use the symmetrical layout?

During Share:
Categorize into literal descriptives (Centered, even margins etc.) and qualitative descriptives (sophisticated, ho-hum, clear)

Discuss reasons why people “default” to centered layout
Familiarity (Academic Papers)
Easy to establish hierarchy
Easy layout – “just hit center”
Not knowing how to change margins/align

3.   We’re now going to read a short piece that discusses symmetry and asymmetry in page design.  As we do this, I’m going to ask you to think about how the author implies his preference for one layout over the other.  As you read, I want you to find things the author writes about the layouts that give us clues as to his attitude about them.  Figuring out what he means without saying it is INFERRING his meaning.

(Distribute Inference Wheel & reading assignment)

As you’re reading, note any statements the author makes that suggest his preference for one layout over another – marking them as you read is a good strategy.  THEN copy those quotes into the inference wheel and interpret what he is suggesting by his choice of words.

When you’re done, write a paragraph that explains John Miles’ bias about page layout, supporting your position by using the quotations from the inference wheel. Explain why you do or do not agree with his position.

You might start with
In “Symmetry and asymmetry,” John Miles seems to prefer ________ over _______ …

To help you with this reading, I’ve picked out a couple of tricky words that we should go over, If you find others while you’re reading, underline them in the text and look them up so that you can get the meaning of the sentence.  Call me over if you have questions as you read.

Show on smartboard:

Static  One layout will produce a more static, restful design
Dynamic while another will produce a more lively and dynamic result.
Doctrinal Is one layout more desirable on doctrinal grounds?
Innocuous One layout can be pleasantly innocuous but boring.

Use think aloud to encourage the process of generating working definitions: Consider if I know the word, if I can use context to figure it out, then look it up.
Use valid student contributions to
Write working definitions on board to remain available through reading.

4.   As students individually complete Inference Worksheet, distribute Try it for Yourself in the version best suited for the amount of time remaining in the period for each student. 

All students produce both an asymmetrical and symmetrical layouts.  However, modified versions of the assignment are offered to students individually based on the pace at which they complete part 1 of the assignment.

Full Version:
You will use your own writing to generate TWO Three Column Layouts in Adobe InDesign – one will demonstrate a symmetrical layout and the other should be an asymmetrical layout.

Select from your journal entries and papers a total of about 600 words of copy you have written – this may be divided between multiple writing pieces. 
Generate a Page Title for your document that represents the collection and a Section Title for each separate piece of copy. Select two to three supporting images from your own work or the clip art library that support the writing.

Generate TWO Three Column Layouts in Adobe InDesign – one will demonstrate a symmetrical layout and the other should be an asymmetrical layout.  Adjust type size, leading and kerning as needed to fit the copy.

EACH of your pages should include:

    3 column layout Page Title A by line with your name A date line indicating today’s date Sections/Articles/Stories each with a headline or section title – Total approximately 600 wds. (This should be an easy fit if you use times new roman 12 as body type) 2-3 images that support the text.

Save files as idd files & pdf. 
Print and hand in

Students with approximately 90 minutes remaining to complete practical assignment:

You will use the copy from the Word Document “symmetry asymmetry copy.docx” (In the handouts folder on the network) to produce TWO Three Column Layouts in Adobe InDesign – one will demonstrate a symmetrical layout and the other should be an asymmetrical layout.

Read through the document and generate a Page Title for your documents.
Using your own images or our clip art library, select two to three images that support the document. Generate TWO Three Column Layouts in Adobe InDesign – one will demonstrate a symmetrical layout and the other should be an asymmetrical layout.  Adjust type size, leading and kerning as needed to fit the copy.

EACH of your pages should include:

    3 column layout Page Title A by line with your name A date line indicating today’s date All copy and headlines from word Document(Keep it in times new roman 12 as body type for an easy fit) 2-3 images that support the text.

Save files as idd files & pdf. 
Print and hand in

 

Students with approximately 60 minutes remaining to complete practical assignment

You will produce TWO Three Column Layouts in Adobe InDesign, using the same content.  One will demonstrate a symmetrical layout and the other should be an asymmetrical layout.

Open the InDesign file “symmetryasymmetry.idd”(In the handouts folder on the network).
You will see that the guides are set for a three column layout and that there are items on the desktop next to the page.

    A Page Title A textbox for a by line and one for a dateline Three textboxes containing the copy for this assignment Two images to support the page.

Arrange all of the items into a symmetrical three column layout .  You can change the fonts, number of text boxes, leading and kerning to make the copy fit the page.  Save and print out this version. 

Arrange the same items into an asymmetrical three column layout.  You can change the fonts,  number of text boxes, leading and kerning to make the copy fit the page. Save and print out this version.

Be certain that each version includes:

    3 column layout Page Title A by line with your name A date line indicating today’s date COMPLETE articles provided with their headlines the images provided.

 Key vocabulary terms:

    Symmetry (Review) Asymmetry  (Review) Balance  (Review)

From Reading:

    Static Dynamic Doctrinal Innocuous

Anticipated length of the lesson: 1 Long Block (2.5 Hrs.  Staggered completion; remaining time for student work on other assignments)

 

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

    Reading (article/assignment sheet) Writing (paragraph on inference w/ graphic organizer) Speaking/Presenting (TPS) Research Vocabulary (reading) Critical Thinking (identifying inference in reading)

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

    Think Pair Share Inference wheel Pre-teach vocabulary from reading

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:

    TPS worksheet (optional – if students know strategy well, writing questions on Smartboard will suffice) “Symmetry and asymmetry” from Design for Desktop Publishing, John Miles (p. 40-41) Inference Wheel Worksheet (See Below) Approximately 600 words of student generated copy – Take from existing journal entries or papers.

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:
See Rubrics Below

 

 

Inference Worksheet Rubric

4

3

2

1

Infers author’s bias and supports with textual references within the paragraph.

Inferred author’s bias is stated within the paragraph,  but support from textual references is evident from the graphic organizer but not fully integrated into paragraph

Ineffective attempt to infer author’s bias because of

Weakness in support from textual references which is consistent from graphic organizer to paragraph
OR
Misinterpretation of valid information from graphic organizer

Ineffective in identifying textual evidence of authors bias in paragraph and graphic organizer

Paragraph states agreement/disagreement with rationale.

Paragraph states agreement/disagreement

agreement/disagreement unclear

No statement of agreement or disagreement

 

Symmetrical/Asymmetrical Layouts Rubric

3

Project work meets all specifications:
3 column layout
Page Title
byline
dateline
articles with headlines
images

2

One or two minor errors in specifications:
3 column layout
Page Title
byline
dateline
articles with headlines
image

1

Error or absences in meeting specifications that interfere with assignment delivery:
3 column layout
Page Title
byline
dateline
articles with headlines
image

Symmetrical layout is presented consistently within work

Symmetrical layout is presented with minor evidence of mixed features

Layout is not identifiable as symmetrical

Asymmetrical layout is presented consistently within work

Asymmetrical layout is presented with minor evidence of mixed features

Layout is not identifiable as asymmetrical


 

What does John Miles think about Symmetrical & Asymmetrical Layouts?

As you read the selection “Symmetry and asymmetry” by John Miles, look for words and phrases which may show a preference for either symmetrical & asymmetrical layouts.  Copy the exact words into the inner ring of the inference circle, and use the outer ring to interpret what he is suggesting.

inference wheel image

Conclusion:

Write a paragraph that explains John Miles’ bias about page layout, supporting your position by using the quotations from the inference wheel. Explain why you do or do not agree with his position.

You might start with:

In “Symmetry and asymmetry,” John Miles seems to prefer ________ over _______ …

 

 

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