Banner

UNIT of Study: Type – From Squiggles to Paragraphs

 

UNIT of Study: Type – From Squiggles to Paragraphs
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty Gorbaty

Essential Questions/Big Ideas of the Unit:

Students need to know about and consciously make typographic choices when developing published documents.

Brief Overview of the Unit:

Students will look at typography sequentially from the smallest units to the largest: Letterforms & the anatomy of type, Typefaces, Typestyles, Fonts, font families & classifications, Leading, Kerning, Tracking, Alignment, and Paragraph Indications.

 

Number of Lessons in the Unit:

List each lesson with the topic/title (Remember that a lesson could span more than one day but comprises a distinct “chunk” of the unit):
1. History of Type/Letterforms
2. Letterforms Continued & Type Measurement
3 Fonts & Font Families
4. Line Length & Type Spacing
5.Typestyles
6. Type Arrangements & Paragraph Indicators

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the unit will include all of the following as noted:

  • Reading 6 of times
  • Writing to Learn 11 of times
  • Writing to Communicate Learning 11 of times
  • Speaking/Presenting/Demonstrating 0 of times
  • Research 1 of times
  • Explicit vocabulary learning 6 times
  • Critical Thinking 6 times

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the unit and number of times each will be used:


Name of Literacy Strategy

Number of times used in the unit

TPS

1

Chapter Preview

1

Triple Entry Vocabulary

6

Random Vocabulary (presents vocabulary from unit at every Moodle login)

6

2 column (Cornell) Notes

6

 

Unit performance assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric):

Understanding key ideas will be assessed on quizzes and assignment work throughout the unit.
Use of typography will be assessed in final portfolio for the course.

 

 

Lesson 1


Lesson topic: History of Type/Letterforms/Measurement
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

  • Develop an understanding of the language of typography, which includes history, technology, and craftsmanship.
  • Identify the parts of a letter

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

  • History of Typography
  • Letterforms

Brief description of the lesson:

Activity 1 Pretest on typography (Moodle based, adaptive – records initial score, but allows students to try again on questions with immediate feedback)

Reading:  Preview text with students Carry over from Introduction
Designing with Type “The Basics of Typography”   (Ch1 pages 7-22) and “Typesetting” 158-160

Presentation 1& 2 :

History of type: http://designingwithtype.com/5/ref_typsetting.php?whatImage=1
PowerPoint: A History of Documents & Printing

In class activity:  Tripple entry Journal for vocabulary

  • Present format
  • Work on mnemonic & visuals for words

Presentation 3
PowerPoint: Anatomy of Type

Activity Exit Ticket

What are the basic ingredients needed to create a “print culture,” one in which documents are routinely reproduced and shared?

 

x

Assignment (1) Letterforms

  • Applying vocabulary
  • Research ancient letterform

Key vocabulary terms:
History of type-
Cold Type / photocomposition-The term for photocomposed type, in which ne heat is required for typesetting
Copy-All written or textural material in an advertisement
Letterpress-the printing method in which the raised surface of the type or blocks, transfers the ink onto the paper with the application of pressure
Linotype / hot metal-hot metal typesetting system

Type anatomy-
Ascender-he part of a lowercase letter, as b, d, f, h, that rises above x-height.
Barb-A type of half serif on the horizontal arms of E, F, L and T
Beak-A type of half serif found on the horizontal arms of E, F, L, and T
Bowl-The curved stroke that encloses a space within a character
Concave-Curving Inward
Convex-Curving or bulging outward
Counter-A negative space within a character that may be fully or partially enclosed
Cross Bar-The horizontal or oblique stroke connected at both ends as in an A or H
Crotch-The pointed space where an arm or arc meets a stem
Descender-That part of a lowercase letter that extends below the main body of the letter
Extender-A term used to refer to both ascenders and descenders
Eye-The counter of enclosed area at the top of the lowercase e
Fillet-Also called bracketing, this refers to the curve of straighter connection between the stroke of a letterform and the serif
Finial-The non-serif ending added to a stroke which is classified as ball, swash, spur, or hook
Flag-decorative, curved strokes connected tot he stem of an uppercase gothic or black letter face
Hairline Stroke-The secondary Stroke of the letterform, usually thinner
Leg-Stroke that extends downward at less than 90 degrees is a leg, as seen on the letters k, K, R
Link-The stroke connecting the bowl and loop of the lowercase g
Loop-The lower portion of the lowercase g
Main stem-The thickest stroke of a character
Shoulder-Curved portion of the stroke of a letterform that connects to a straight stroke
Spine-Main curved stroke of the letter s
Splayed-Defines the stem of a character that is wider at the top and the bottom than it is toward the center
Spur-The nodule descending from the vertical stroke of an uppercase G connecting the straight stroke to the curved stroke
Stem Stroke-The main stroke of a character
Stroke-Any line required as part of the basic construction of a letterform, not including serifs or swashes
Swash-A fancy flourish that replaces the terminal or serif on scripts and alternate characters
Tail-A stroke or arc of a character starting from a mail stroke or structure of a letterfrom and extending downward with one end free as seen in R, K, Q
Terminal-The free end of a stroke
Tittle-Name of the dot above the i
Vertex-The outer downward juncture of two angled stems where the resulting point touches just below the baseline

 

Anticipated length of the lesson: 2 sessions@ 2 hrs. each

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading - textbook
  • Writing – Letterforms assignment, exit ticket
  • Research Letterforms assignment
  • Vocabulary – Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking – Letterforms assignment

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):
Text

Chapter preview/tour – Introduce text
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:

History of Type: http://designingwithtype.com/5/ref_typsetting.php?whatImage=1
Powerpoint: Typography 1
Tripple Entry Template
Designing with Type “The Basics of Typography”   (Ch1 pages 7-22) and “Typesetting” 158-160
Assignment 1 Letterforms

 

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

  • See Letterforms Rubric on assignment sheet
  • Quiz on Basics of type –During week after delivery of first three lessons.

 

 

Early Letterform / Assignment 1


Overview
Without letters, there would be no written words. Without written words, there wouldn’t be documents to edit and publish.
This exercise will introduce you to Adobe Illustrator, a graphics program that will allow you to use lines and shapes to create artwork.

Choose
· Choose a letter from an ancient alphabet. (Phoenician and Greek scripts are shown on p 120 of Designing with Type, as are some design ideas)

Draw
Use Illustrator to develop a satisfying representation of that letter.
· Please make your drawing 7” x7”
· Experiment with the shape tools, line tools, brush tool, and or pen tool to create your representation. Multiple versions are encouraged, as each attempt will increase your familiarity with the tools.

Research & Write
Do some mini-research to learn a bit more about your letter, and develop about 100 words of copy that tell about the letter.
The writing might include information on the origins of the letter, what other letters it relates to or your own impressions of the look of the letter.

Combine
Merge your copy with your drawing of the letter to create an interesting arrangement! Save the document as a PDF and submit it via Moodle.

Grading Rubric


3 Pt

2 Pt

1 Pt

File submitted as PDF with 7” x 7” size

Work submitted in wrong size or format

Work submitted not recognizable as this assignment

Work demonstrates a highly successful attempt to use drawing tools to develop a letterform

Work shows ability to use drawing tools to produce recognizable letterform

Drawing of letterform absent or entirely unrecognizable

Work shows the ability to integrate copy and graphics in an Illustrator file with a pleasing layout and attention to writing conventions

Work shows the ability to integrate copy and graphics in an Illustrator File

Copy on letterform absent or entirely unrecognizable

 

Lesson 2


Lesson topic: Type Measurement
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

Understand the system of measurement used in typography
Understand how typographic measurements are employed when working with design/layout software.

 

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

Type measurement & Terminology

 

Brief description of the lesson:

Reading
Designing with Type “The Basics of Typography”   (Ch1 pages 7-22)

Presentation: PowerPoint: Anatomy of Type
Activity:  Practice measuring Type (Ungraded)
Worksheet – Practice Measuring Type

Remainder of class time used to complete letterforms assignment

Exit Ticket:

Provide an example of how the  history of type contributes to the language we use today.

What was the most interesting word or idea that you learned about letterforms or type?

 

Key vocabulary terms:
Measurement-
EM-Unit of measure of print type equal to the square of a type letter
Mean Line-The imaginary line defining the height of lowercase letters excluding ascenders
Pica-Type setting unit of measure for line length (6 per inch)
Waist Line-The invisible or imaginary horizontal rule that indicates the top of the body height of the lowercase letters, determines the x-height
X height-Distance from baseline to waist line
Ascender line-The imaginary line defining the height of ascenders
Decender line-The imaginary line defining the height of descenders
Point-Type setting unit of measure for characters and leading
Baseline-The imaginary line below the bodies of characters.  Used to measure leading

 

Anticipated length of the lesson: One class

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading  chapter
  • Writing Exit Ticket
  • Speaking/Presenting
  • Research
  • Vocabulary – Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking Type measuring

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

Cornell Notes -  strategy for taking notes from lectures & reading
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:
Worksheet – Practice Measuring Type

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

Quiz on Basics of type –During week after delivery of first three lessons

 

 

Lesson 3

Lesson topic: Fonts & Font Families
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

  • Develop an understanding of the language of typography, which includes history, technology, and craftsmanship
  • Identify and distinguish between basic typefaces and identify nuances of specific letterforms.
  • Describe and distinguish between the five families of type
  • Explore specifically the relationship between experimental/visual and functional typographic design with readability as its ultimate goal.

 

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

  • Five classic Font Faces
  • Text & Decorative Type
  • Type Classification
  • Choose appropriate fonts and point sizes based on text characteristics
  • Explain the difference between readability and legibility of type

 

Brief description of the lesson:
Reading: Designing with Type “Five Classic Typefaces” Ch2 p 23-60

Warm Up Activity:  Share Triple Entry insights on type terminology

Lecture: Powerpoint “Type 1”
Recommend use of two column notes; provide template
Text Type – Five Classic Fonts

  • Oldstyle
  • Transitional
  • Modern
  • Egyptian/Slab Serif
  • Sans Serif
      • Subtle differences
  • X-height
  • Stroke (thick & thin lines)
  • Stress (where thick & thin shift )
  • Serifs

READABILITY –LOOK – FEEL

  • Stroke
  • Thick & thin
  • More even stroke
  • Stress
  • Serifs
  • Flourishes or ornaments on the endpoints of the lines that create letters
  • Back to X-heights…
  • Same point size but x-height influences apparent size  & the number of characters that fit a line…
  • Other factors that impact readability
  • Leading –
  • Tracking
  • The spacing between words
  • Kerning
  • The spacing between letters
  • Kerning? Ligatures?
  • Ligatures
  • Special characters that combine tricky letter combinations more artfully
  • Why is all this important?
  • Readability
  • Creating a quality look for each page
  • Making the copy fit into its designated space

TPS: Identifying fonts by family: http://designingwithtype.com/5/id_typefaces.php

Activity: Same Type in three Fonts

Exit Ticket:

What is the most noticeable characteristic of a font that will immediately place it in or outside of one family?

Which font family do you think is most commonly used in typesetting popular paperback novels?  Why do you think this?

Key vocabulary terms:

Classic Typefaces:

  • Oldstyle
  • Transitional
  • Modern
  • Egyptian/Slab Serif
  • Sans Serif

Type anatomy-
Ascender-he part of a lowercase letter, as b, d, f, h, that rises above x-height.
Barb-A type of half serif on the horizontal arms of E, F, L and T
Beak-A type of half serif found on the horizontal arms of E, F, L, and T
Bowl-The curved stroke that encloses a space within a character
Concave-Curving Inward
Convex-Curving or bulging outward
Counter-A negative space within a character that may be fully or partially enclosed
Cross Bar-The horizontal or oblique stroke connected at both ends as in an A or H
Crotch-The pointed space where an arm or arc meets a stem
Descender-That part of a lowercase letter that extends below the main body of the letter
Extender-A term used to refer to both ascenders and descenders
Eye-The counter of enclosed area at the top of the lowercase e
Fillet-Also called bracketing, this refers to the curve of straighter connection between the stroke of a letterform and the serif
Finial-The non-serif ending added to a stroke which is classified as ball, swash, spur, or hook
Flag-decorative, curved strokes connected tot he stem of an uppercase gothic or black letter face
Hairline Stroke-The secondary Stroke of the letterform, usually thinner
Leg-Stroke that extends downward at less than 90 degrees is a leg, as seen on the letters k, K, R
Link-The stroke connecting the bowl and loop of the lowercase g
Loop-The lower portion of the lowercase g
Main stem-The thickest stroke of a character
Shoulder-Curved portion of the stroke of a letterform that connects to a straight stroke
Spine-Main curved stroke of the letter s
Splayed-Defines the stem of a character that is wider at the top and the bottom than it is toward the center
Spur-The nodule descending from the vertical stroke of an uppercase G connecting the straight stroke to the curved stroke
Stem Stroke-The main stroke of a character
Stroke-Any line required as part of the basic construction of a letterform, not including serifs or swashes
Swash-A fancy flourish that replaces the terminal or serif on scripts and alternate characters
Tail-A stroke or arc of a character starting from a mail stroke or structure of a letterfrom and extending downward with one end free as seen in R, K, Q
Terminal-The free end of a stroke
Tittle-Name of the dot above the i
Vertex-The outer downward juncture of two angled stems where the resulting point touches just below the baseline

Anticipated length of the lesson: 1 Class

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading Chapter 2
  • Writing Analytical question on assignment, exit ticket
  • Vocabulary Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking: Analytical question on assignment, Identifying font families

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

TPS – Allows deeper independent and collaborative consideration of questions
Cornell Notes -  strategy for taking notes from lectures & reading
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:

PowerPoint:“Type 1”
Designing with Type “Five Classic Typefaces” Ch2 p 23-60
http://designingwithtype.com/5/id_typefaces.php

 

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

  • See Letterforms Rubric on assignment sheet
  • Quiz on Basics of type –During week after delivery of first three lessons.

 

 

Same Type – Three Fonts

Choose any type sample of about 100 words (a paragraph or so)

Create an Adobe InDesign Document that is three columns wide

Copy your text into a textbox, and fit the textbox to the column width. The box should be slightly longer than the text.

Make the text 11 pt. and retain this size throughout the exercise.

Copy and paste the textbox to make three equally sized textboxes with the same text.
Experiment with changing the font to a variety of text fonts(avoid highly decorative or stylized type for this). You may alter the leading (linespacing) as well, but leave other attributes alone.
Choose three presentations that you find interesting – please include one sans serif font and one serif font. Label the three textboxes with the font name, size & leading. (Example:Times New Roman 11/13.8)


Then write a short description for each of your choices describing how each choice impacts the text. Does it change how the lines break? Does it change how long the piece runs? Does it contribute to the meaning of the text by echoing the style of the writing or by contrasting it? Is it easy to read?


This writing assignment can be added to the bottom of your page or submitted as a word document.

Save the Illustrator file as both a .idd and export as a .pdf. Submit the pdf to Moodle.

Grading Rubric

 

3 Pt

2 Pt

1 Pt

Produces file to specifications

File submitted as PDF with three columns & three textboxes labeled as specified

Work submitted in wrong format or has minor errors in size/labeling specifications.

Work submitted not recognizable as this assignment

Font Use

Fonts all 11 pt, text appropriate, only altered in leading.

Fonts do not remain consistent at 11 pt or settings other than font face and leading have been altered.

Fonts do not remain consistent at 11 pt or settings other than font face and leading have been altered.

Font Choice

Serif & Sans Serif represented, font choices show significant variety

Serif & Sans Serif represented

Serif & Sans Serif not represented

Relevance

The description directly address key issues, & questions. The description applies course concepts well.

The description addresses key issues & questions indirectly. It does not always apply course concepts fully

Either there was no description, or the description does not directly address the question or problem posed by the activity.

Thoughtful writing

The description offers original or thoughtful  analysis, or observation that demonstrates a strong grasp of concepts

The description does offer some analysis, or observation to the topic but doesn’t demonstrate a full understanding of concepts and ideas

Either there was no description, or the description shows little understanding

Writing is supported :

The description employs rational argument or evidence

Some effort at argument or evidence. However, unsupported opinions still appear.

Either there was no description, or the description contains largely unsupported opinion

 

 

Lesson 4

Lesson topic:  Line Length & Type Spacing
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

  • Adjust kerning, tracking & leading to assure fit, create emphasis, and support readability

 

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

  • Adjust kerning, tracking & leading to assure fit, create emphasis, and support readability 

Brief description of the lesson:

Reading:
Designing with Type “Designing With Text Type” Ch 3 62-69

Presentation:
PowerPoint Type 2

Demonstration:
Using InDesign – Text boxes and Adjusting attributes

Quiz Basics of Type

Exit Ticket:

How does InDesign compare with word processing software such as Word?

Key vocabulary terms:
Line length & character spacing-
Copy Fit-The process of specifying type in a particular font intended to fit into a designed area in the final composition
Tracking-The distance between words
Kerning-Typesetting technique that overlaps the edges of two type characters to provide the illusion of even spacing and to reduce the amount of white space between letters
Leading-Spacing between lines
Line Length-Refers to line measure Measured in Pica
Line Spacing-Incorrect term for leading
Minus-Negative space setting between typeset characters
Minusing-Decreasing the space between typeset characters in text settings
Monospacing-Refers to fonts which each character occupies the same amount of space
Set Solid-A typesetting term that refers to type with no additional leading between the lines

Anticipated length of the lesson: One Class Period

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading Chapter
  • Writing Exit ticket
  • Speaking/Presenting
  • Research
  • Vocabulary Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

Cornell Notes -  strategy for taking notes from lectures & reading
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson

Designing with Type “Designing With Text Type” Ch 3 62-69
PowerPoint Type 2
Adobe InDesign
Moodle based quiz - Basics of Type

 

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

See Typestyles Activity
Type Quiz 2 –During week after delivery of three lessons.

 

 

Lesson 5

Lesson topic: TypeStyles
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

  • Apply the principles of hierarchy and dominance to typographic elements.

 

 

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

Understanding type conventions

 

Brief description of the lesson:
Reading:
Designing with Type “Designing With Text Type” Ch 3 62-69

Presentation:
PowerPoint: Type 2

Activity:
Typestyles

Exit Ticket:
What are five uses of italics?
In what situation might you choose Lg/Sm caps over bold for emphasis?

Key vocabulary terms:

Roman
Bold
Italic
Small Caps
Hierarchy
Dominance
Weight

Anticipated length of the lesson:  one class

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading Chapter
  • Writing Typestyles assignment, exit ticket
  • Speaking/Presenting
  • Research
  • Vocabulary Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking Typestyles Assignment

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

Cornell Notes -  strategy for taking notes from lectures & reading
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:
Designing with Type “Designing With Text Type” Ch 3 62-69
PowerPoint Type 2
Adobe InDesign

 

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

Typestyles Activity
Type Quiz 2 –During week after delivery of three lessons.

 

 

Typestyles

Choose any type sample of about 50 words.  A quote or a short poem will work well for this assignment.

Create an Adobe InDesign Document that is two columns wide.  At the top, create a text box that will contain a page title.  Create 6 text boxes that are each Width: 22p0 Height: 16p0.  Place your copy into each of the first three textboxes using regular capitalization conventions.  Place the copy set in all caps into the next two text boxes, leaving the remaining text box empty.

 

Hint: If you take the text from a Microsoft word document, you can set it in all caps using the font menu on the home toolbar

 

 

Select a text font that has multiple typestyles including Regular (Roman) Italic and Bold.  Use your chosen font for each of the boxes, and adjust the style of each box to represent the following set:

* note that small and large caps is achieved by changing the font size within the word.  (Second & subsequent letters 2-3 sizes smaller than first letter.)

Adjust the font size, kerning, tracking and line length to create an appealing presentation of each sample.

Place the name of your font and your name in the title box. Use a size appropriate for a page title. (Think display font.)

Provide a statement in the last textbox indicating which typestyle you fee best suits your selected text.  Explain why the style works well with the sample.

Save the InDesign file as both an .idd and a .pdf. Submit the pdf to Moodle.

Extra Credit:  Add an additional page or pages to your file and try other existing styles of your font (bold italic, condensed, narrow, etc.) OR Repeat the exercise with another font

Grading Rubric

 

3 Pt

2 Pt

1 Pt

Produces file to specifications

File submitted as PDF with columns, textboxes and page title as specified

Work submitted in wrong format or has minor errors in size/labeling specifications.

Work submitted not recognizable as this assignment

Font Use

One font used consistently throughout assignment

 

More than one font represented within the assignment

Font Styles

All five font styles represented

 

Less than required five font styles represented

Adjustments

Font size, kerning, leading, line length adjusted to create a visually appealing and readable presentation of the text.

Font size and line length  adjusted to present readable text with logical breaks.

Font size, kerning, tracking and line length not adjusted or adjusted in ways that detract from presentation of text.

Thoughtful writing

The statement offers original or thoughtful  analysis, or observation that demonstrates a strong grasp of concepts

The statement does offer some analysis, or observation to the topic but doesn’t demonstrate a full understanding of concepts and ideas

Either there was no statement, or the statement shows little understanding

Writing is supported :

The statement employs rational argument or evidence

Some effort at argument or evidence. However, unsupported opinions still appear.

Either there was no statement, or the statement contains largely unsupported opinion

 

Lesson 6

Lesson topic: Type Arrangements & Paragraph Indicators
CTE program area: Editing & Publication Design
Instructor’s name: Barbara Gorbaty

Purpose/objective of the lesson:
(what you want students to learn/be able to do after instruction)

Organize words and images in design layouts using type arrangements and alignments
Apply multiple traditional and nontraditional paragraph indicators.

 

Content/program/literacy standards addressed in the lesson:

Understanding alignments & paragraph indicators

 

Brief description of the lesson:

Reading:
Designing with Type “Designing With Text Type” Ch3 70-79

Presentation:
PowerPoint : Type 3

Activity: Type Arrangements

Activity: Paragraph indicators

Exit Ticket:

Which settings of “The Little Girl and the Wolf” did you like best and least? Explain

Key vocabulary terms:
Paragraphs-
Column-Area of copy that runs vertically down the page of a newspaper or magazine
Column Rule-A line used between two columns of type
Hanging Cap-Also referred to as a hanging initial, a hanging cap is set larger than the body text and extends beyond the left margin of the body text and extends beyond the left margin of the rest of the para.
Hanging Indent-A typesetting instruction used to indicate that the first line of a paragraph is set flush left while following lines are indented
Hanging Punctuation-Punctuation set outside the margin so that the type aligns visually along the right or left side of the paragraph either flush left or flush right

Anticipated length of the lesson:  One Class

To deepen understanding of content and support literacy development, the lesson will include (circle all that apply):

  • Reading Chapter
  • Writing Type Arrangements, Exit Ticket
  • Speaking/Presenting
  • Research
  • Vocabulary Presentations, triple entry, random glossary entry
  • Critical Thinking Type arrangements & Paragraph Indicators

Specific literacy strategies that students will use during the lesson and reason for using each (attach or link to required templates):

Cornell Notes -  strategy for taking notes from lectures & reading
Triple entry Vocab – Vocabulary development
Random glossary entry – Vocabulary development
Exit Ticket – Writing to learn/formative assessment

 

Texts, materials, or other instructional resources needed for the lesson:

 

Formative or summative assessment (describe and attach or link to rubric:

Type Quiz 2 –During week after delivery of three lessons.

 

 

Type Arrangements

Choose any type sample from your OWN writing that contains at least 5 paragraphs.

Create an Adobe InDesign Document with either a two or three column layout, 8 ½” x 11”.

Place your copy into either single text boxes or multiple, flowed textboxes

Choose type, titles/headings column widths that suit the text. 

Make Multiple Samples: You will need a total of FIVE versions of the text sample.  (This may well extend onto multiple pages)

 

Align the versions into the following configurations:

* note that you may want to break the copy into multiple text boxes for the random alignment)

 

Provide a statement at the end of your document that describes the impression made by each arrangement.  Note strengths, weaknesses or situations in which this alignment would or wouldn’t work for this copy..

Save the InDesign file as both an .idd and a .pdf. Submit the pdf to Moodle.

 

Grading Rubric

 

3 Pt

2 Pt

1 Pt

Produces file to specifications

File submitted as PDF and is within specifications

Work submitted in wrong format or has minor errors in specifications.

Work submitted not recognizable as this assignment

All requested arrangements presented

All 5 arrangements represented

 

Less than 5 arrangements represented

Type Adjustments

Font choice, size, kerning, leading, line length suitable to text type and adjusted to create a visually appealing and readable presentation of the text.

Font choice, size, kerning, leading, line length suitable to text type

Irregularities in typography detract from presentation of copy.

Thoughtful writing

The statement offers original or thoughtful  analysis, or observation that demonstrates a strong grasp of concepts

The statement does offer some analysis, or observation to the topic but doesn’t demonstrate a full understanding of concepts and ideas

Either there was no statement, or the statement shows little understanding

 

Paragraph Indications


Purpose: To demonstrate a wide variety of ways to indicate paragraphs and to show how they affect the look and readability of the setting.

Assignment. Using any series of paragraphs from your own writing, create five (5) variations that treat the delineation between paragraphs differently. Create alternate ways of indicating new paragraphs, ranging from conservative, to outrageous. (In the last case readability is not a criterion.) Each solution should be presented on its own page. Study the results, weighing the trade-off between the traditional approaches and those that are more exploratory, and notice how the various solutions affect readability.

Format:

Make your pages either 8 1/2" x 11" OR 8" x 8"  (be consistent
for all layouts)  All layouts should be contained in a multi-page file.
Save as both an InDesign file and a PDF.  Submit the PDF for grading.


SEE PAGE 112 for the source of this assignment and some interesting samples.

Grading Rubric

 

3 Pt

2 Pt

1 Pt

Produces file to
specifications

File submitted as
PDF and is within specifications

Work submitted in
wrong format or has minor errors in specifications.

Work submitted
not recognizable as this assignment

Distinct Paragraph
Indications

Five distinctly
different solutions presented

 

Less than 5 solutions
represented

Range of Paragraph
Indications

A wide and
distributed range of solutions that spans from conservative to outrageous

A range of
solutions that spans from conservative to outrageous is evident

Narrow range of
solutions

Type Adjustments

Font choice, size,
kerning, leading, line length suitable to text type and adjusted to create a
visually appealing and/ or readable presentation of the text.

Font choice, size,
kerning, leading, line length suitable to text type

Irregularities in
typography detract from presentation of copy.

 

Powerpoints:
























 

 

Reading - Motivation - Writing - Presentations - Problem Solving - Vocabulary - Research - Strategies - Videos - Lesson Plan - Unit Plan - About the Author - About this Site - References